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Public relations tactics that work

This evergreen post was first published on our blog in 2009. We’ve updated it and republished it.

Everybody loves to win!

When we were children, we may have avidly collected cereal box tops or points in order to enter a contest. We also may have colored a picture to send to the local weather broadcast hoping to be selected the “Weather Picture of the Week.” These days with ubiquitous cell phone cameras, many of us submit photos to our local news outlets for their weekly or daily Picture of the Day/Week. We buy lottery tickets and enter contests believing that our luck is great and we will win. We enjoy competing and being singled out as special. 

Each one of us believes that we have a specialness about some aspect of our lives. An entire generation of children have been raised believing that they are special. Psychologists call this Pseudo-exceptionalism. Jeremy E Sherman Ph.D., MPP writes in his post on Psychology Today, “Pseudo-exceptionalism — the unearned conviction that we are exceptional, superior to others because we were born…us.” 

When it comes to public relations for your company, you can use these traits of human nature to your advantage.

People love contests. We are competitive by nature and want to demonstrate our prowess. Look at the success of America’s Got Talent, American Idol and other competitive reality television shows. We get a vicarious thrill rooting for those we favor. Businesses love contests because through contests they are able to increase brand awareness, build their email marketing lists, gain new social media followers, and move the needle of those visiting the brand’s website. Contests can be synchronized to fit holiday schedules and seasonal business goals. They can help you boost sales. 

Contests are one of the oldest ways to bring attention to a company. They work well when piggybacked on current news or cultural trends making the news.  As an example, mother’s day and father’s day contests and sweepstakes giveaways are very popular.

We also like to share our opinions with others.  Whether use use social media comments, consumer surveys or Google Reviews, we crowd source referrals for auto repair, haircuts, new doctors and lawn care.

As noted on Marketing Charts, and from Kantar Media’s report Dimension 2019 “Just one-third (33%) of consumers who rely on advertising for brand information say they trust its messaging, making it the least credible source of information among the options given.”  Most of us rely on friends and family for recommendations. However, we also rely on review sites. “Some 44% of the respondents across 5 markets use reviews for brand information, with 7 in 10 of these trusting the information they find.”

What Brand Information Sources Do People Trust the Most?

Businesses regularly use Google Reviews to spotlight their superiority and Google uses them to help show us companies which are more successful their others. Here’s an example of how one company calls for their social media followers to rate their company on Google.

Survey says!

Conducting surveys to allow your company to announce the results and spotlight your firm’s knowledge of what customers think is a sound tactic. You make the news — especially if your survey is timed to fit the news cycle. BrandSpark is a company that issues brand trust awards which regularly surveys consumers to learn which brands are most trusted. In doing so, they make the news. 

As another example, YouGov and ACI Worldwide surveyed consumers to learn they are “concerned about the security of their financial data when they pay at gas pumps and convenience stores.” ACI Worldwide states that they “deliver electronic banking and payment solutions for more than 5000 financial institutions, merchants, billers and processors around the world.” By conducting this survey ACI signals to merchants their awareness of consumer issues, thus increasing the opportunity for trust from those needing payment and electronic banking services.

Surveys do not need to be national. They can be local. So can contests. Have you used contests, giveaways, surveys or research to help position and market your firm? Tell us about how you used them.

Remember, The most successful marketing tactics and strategies build on human nature and on current trends and seasonality.  

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